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Athabasca University

Dr. Hugh Notman

Associate Dean, Learning Technologies and Associate Professor, Anthropology, Biological

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Biography

I joined the Anthropology Program at Athabasca University in 2006. I am a biological anthropologist with a specialization in Primatology. I received my MSc from the University of Oxford (1996) at the Institute of Biological Anthropology, and my PhD in primatology from the University of Calgary (2003) (Department of Anthropology). I am currently an associate professor in biological anthropology at Athabasca University. I am also an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Calgary. I currently live in Canmore, Alberta with my wife and two young sons.

My research interests are broadly centered on primate behaviour and ecology, with specific emphases on the ecology and cognition of vocal behaviour. Species of interest t include chimpanzees (Budongo Forest, Uganda), spider monkeys (Runaway Creek Nature Reserve, Belize) and vervet monkeys (Samara Game Reserve, South Africa).

Wild Chimpanzee From the Budongo Forest

A pant-hooting chimpanzee from Uganda
(Photo: Hugh Notman)

Recent Publications

Dubreuil, C. Notman, H. & Pavelka M.S. (2015) Sex Differences in the Use of Whinny Vocalizations in Spider Monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi). International Journal of Primatology, 36(2), 412-428.

Hartwell, K. S., Notman, H., Bonenfant, C., & Pavelka, M. S. (2014). Assessing the occurrence of sexual segregation in spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi yucatanensis), its mechanisms and function. International Journal of Primatology, 35(2), 425-444.

Evans, K. J., Pavelka, M. S., Hartwell, K. S., & Notman, H. (2012). Do Adult Male Spider Monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) Preferentially Handle Male Infants?. International Journal of Primatology, 33(4), 799-808. Dubreuil, Colin, . "Sex Differences in the Use of Whinny Vocalizations in Spider Monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi)." (2014).

Newton-Fisher, N.E., Notman, H., Reynolds, V. (2002). Hunting, consumption and sharing of mammalian prey by Budongo Forest chimpanzees. Folia Primatologica 73(5), 281-283.

Santorelli CJ, Schaffner CM, Campbell CJ, Notman H, Pavelka MS, et al. (2011) Traditions in Spider Monkeys Are Biased towards the Social Domain. PLoS ONE 6(2): e16863. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0016863

Rendall, D., Notman, H. & Owren, M.J. (2009). Asymmetries in the individual distinctiveness and maternal recognition of infant contact calls and distress screams in baboons. Journal of the Acoustic Society of America (JASA),125(3) pp. 1792-1805.

Rendall, D., Notman, H., Vokey, J. (2007). Homologizing the mind: Frodoian or Fodorian Psychology? In: Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology (Ed. R. Dunbar & L. Barrett). Oxford University Press. pp. 59-70.

Notman, H. (2006). Deciphering junglespeak: An update on chimpanzee vocalizations, referential communication and their relationship to language. In: Primates of Western Uganda (Ed. by H. Notman, N. Newton-Fisher, V. Reynolds and J. Paterson). Plenum Press.

Notman, H. & Rendall, D. (2005). Contextual variation in chimpanzee pant hoots and its implications for referential communication. Animal Behaviour, 70, 177-190.

Notman, H. & Munn, J. (2003). A case of infant carrying by an adult male chimpanzee in the Budongo Forest. Pan Africa News 10(1) June Issue.

Updated January 27 2014 by Student & Academic Services

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